While beer is king, there are plenty of fantastic bars in Prague where you’ll be able to taste some of the finest Czech wine. The Czech Republic has a long history of producing the beverage, which dates back to the second century, and it’s becoming increasingly popular internationally. Czech wine isn’t widely dispersed on foreign markets so don’t miss your chance to try some of the local vino while in Prague. 

Discover the world of Czech Wine

Wine production in the country can be traced back all the way back to the time of the Romans. There are a few vineyards located north of Prague in Bohemia, but the vast majority of the Czech Republic’s wine is produced in southeast Moravia. Thanks to this, Czech wine is commonly referred to as ‘Moravian wine’. Winemaking in Prague itself is limited to a few very small vineyards. Rumored to be the oldest vineyard in Bohemia, the St. Wenceslas Vineyard at Prague Castle is open to visitors year-round.

When tasting Czech wine in Prague, be sure to ask to try pálava, muškát moravský, or cabernet moravia. These wines are unique to the Czech Republic so don’t miss your opportunity to try them as they’ll likely be difficult to find outside of the country. Around mid-August, you may find burčák at some bars in Prague. Known as ‘young wine’, this alcoholic beverage is the fermented grape juice that separates during the pressing process. If you have the opportunity, be sure to try this local specialty!

Learn the lingo

While you’ll find some familiar names on any wine list in Prague, you’ll also see a few you may not recognize. While foreign wines will keep their internationally recognized name, their Czech counterpart may go by something completely different. For example, if you want to try a Czech pinot gris, check the menu for rulandské šedé. It’s the same grape but with a traditionally Czech name. Similarly, pinot noir is known as rulandské modré

Knowing a few more Czech words will be helpful if you know what kind of wine you’d like but aren’t sure what to order. If you prefer dry or semi-dry wines, you’ll want to ask what the suché and polosuché options are.

Asking for polosladké or sladké will get you a semi-sweet or sweet wine. Of course, you can always ask your sommelier for a Czech pinot gris or a dry white wine, but it’ll be more fun to impress them with your Czech wine knowledge.

Best bars for drinking wine in Prague

Luckily for wine enthusiasts, there are plenty of excellent wine bars in Prague for drinking your favorites from around the world or tasting something local. If you’re looking to try some Czech wine, stop by these spots in particular:

Vinograf Senovážné Náměstí (Vinograf Wine Bar)

The bigger of Vinograf’s two locations in Prague, Vinograf Senovážné boasts an impressive selection of over 700 different wines. It serves up to 50 of those by the glass so there’s plenty of options to choose from.

Vinograf Míšeňská

Vinograf’s smaller location, Vinograf Míšeňská, focuses on Czech wines and has up to 35 different options available by the glass. Their selection includes small winemakers as well as bigger names, making a great choice if you want to try a variety of wines produced in the country.

Veltlin

Veltlin serves authentic, natural wines from the area of the former Habsburg Empire that have been grown and produced with sustainability in mind. One of the many things that makes this wine bar unique is that there’s no wine list. The friendly staff will be happy to discuss the wines with you and open a bottle that fits your tastes.

Cellarius

Cellarius has four different locations around Prague. The Lucerna location holds the title of the longest-running wine shop in the city. While each location is a little bit different, all four offer an impressive selection of Czech and foreign wines from around the world.

Bokovka 

A rustic courtyard provides the unique backdrop for Bokovka. This one of a kind wine bar will be able to offer you a glass from every winemaking region in the country, making it a great spot to check out if you’re keen to try a little bit of everything. 

Den Noc

Den Noc offers a little bit of everything from breakfast to wine tastings. Their collection specializes in wines from the Czech Republic with special attention paid to small batches and those from small winemakers. The sommeliers will be happy to tell you the story of who made your wine and where it came from, so don’t be afraid to ask.

Tempo Allegro

Located close to Charles Bridge, Tempo Allegro is the perfect place to stop for a glass of wine while sightseeing. They serve twelve types of carefully selected Czech wines as well as a number of Italian and French options.

photo credit: www.tempoallegro.cz

Vinný sklep Újezd

Vinný sklep Újezd hosts regular wine tastings in Malá Strana so be sure to check their schedule for the next one. This wine bar’s underground cellar creates a sublime atmosphere for sipping Moravian wine.

Vínečko

The Vínečko wine bar serves a wide selection of bottled and cask wine from the Czech Republic and abroad. During the summer, they have two gardens that are perfect for enjoying wine outside in the fresh air.

Whether you prefer white or red, you won’t be disappointed by the available selection of foreign and domestic wines in Prague. If you’re not sure where to start when it comes to Czech wine, our Prague Evening Food Tour is a great option as you’ll get a chance to taste some of the country’s best wines in a secret wine cellar below Prague’s medieval streets. With an excellent selection of wine bars and its unique grape varietals, no wine lover should leave Prague without trying the country’s exceptional vino

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